Whole30: Prepping

Prepping for WHOLE30Starting on Memorial day, my family and I are going to be doing the Whole30. This weekend I have been finding recipes, shopping, and prepping our house. Our fridge is now filled with fruits and veggies:

whole30 prep

whole30 prep

 

And we have a freezer full of meat:

whole30 prep

I also made ghee (using this recipe):

homemade ghee

 

I have been considering a Whole30 for weeks, but only just got up the courage to commit. I put it out there on Facebook to see if anyone wanted to join me and to help hold myself accountable. My main hesitation, is, and always has been, that I love food. Sometimes a little too much, as I have written about before. I am hoping that a Whole30 can help me with my food cravings but I don’t plan on suffering through the next month, I still want to enjoy what I am eating. My favorite rule of Whole30 is: “Do not try to re-create baked goods,  junk foods, or treats with ‘approved’ ingredients.” This isn’t a month of limping along, surviving on “healthy” imitations of my favorite food, it’s separating ties with those foods for a month and focusing on healthy, clean food that is good for my body. At least, that is my hope.

I want sugar to loosen its hold on my body and mind. I want to be stronger than my cravings. I want to have more energy, feel happier, and all the other benefits I have been reading about from those who have successfully finished a Whole30. Bring it on September! I am ready!

 

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Why I Love CrossFit

WHYILOVECROSFITT

I have participated in a lot of different sports and activities; tap dance, ballet, gymnastics, soccer, tennis, swimming, water polo, ultimate frisbee and aerobics–I love a group/team atmosphere. That’s probably why working out, alone, in a gym just wasn’t working for me. I was hesitant to try CrossFit, not because I thought I wouldn’t like it, but because I was pretty sure I would like it, and it’s a lot more expensive than a gym membership. The truth is, CrossFit is worth every penny. I am addicted to CrossFit! Heres why:

1. No Planning Involved: I just show up and work hard.

2. Constant Variety: There are a few WODs we come back to, but for the most part everyday is different than the last. I find the constant change motivating. I never know what to expect, so I don’t dread it.

3. Very Scaleable: I have a long way to go in my fitness journey, yet I can come and do the same workout as everyone else–I just have to adjust some things. And it is so exciting when I get stronger and have to scale less and less.

4. It’s My Break: I get to leave the kids for and hour and a half and focus on me. That little break makes the rest of the 23.5 hours of the day so much more enjoyable.

5. I Feel Strong: During most WODs I reach a wall and feel like quitting, but then I push through and it feels amazing when I finish. This mindset has been seeping into other aspects of my day. When something gets unbearable, I remind myself that I can do hard things.

6. CrossFit is a Family: Everything is measured and tracked, which seems like it would lend itself to being all about the individual, but in my experience, it’s the complete opposite. I feel like part of a family. One person’s success or PR is celebrated by all. The camaraderie keeps me coming back, week after week.

Postpartum Recovery

New Baby

Last January, I had a repeat C-Section (In a perfect world, I would have had natural births, but I couldn’t and thats ok). My first recovery was a breeze. That’s the recurring theme of my parenting with my first. Easy. I call my first daughter, Penny, my angel baby. She was too good, too easy.

I was so unprepared for my second. Eloise is the sweetest baby, sweet, but not easy. Not simple. Such was my postpartum recovery my second time around. It hurt more, I needed my meds more, and I had much more responsibility. Andrew stayed home with Penny most of the time so I started feeling alone in the hospital. I went home a day earlier so I could be home with Penny.

Help was offered to me by my friends, my parents, my sisters and even my mother-in-law but I didn’t accept enough of it. It is so hard to admit I need it. Andrew couldn’t afford to take unpaid leave and he only had a little paid time off. So I powered through, and that was the wrong thing to do. It’s wrong, because with a newborn and a toddler life doesn’t get easy and normal again for a long time. For me it took months, sleep deprived nights, Crossfit, and a move across the country before I started feeling normal again.

All of the things people warned me about with my first, like how sleep deprived I would be, how hard a baby was on a marriage, how much I would need time to myself, how unpredictable babies can be, how rough sleep training is–none of it was applicable until my second and I was so, so unprepared. 

Here is my list of things I would do differently, things I plan to do the next time I have a baby:

1. Have my husband stay in the hospital with me overnight. The nurses were helpful, but I really needed Andrew, especially during the middle of the night nursing. I overextended myself trying to get Eloise set up in the hospital bed to nurse, and with a very sore stomach this was a bad idea. 

2. Have my husband take at least a week off of work (better yet, two weeks!) This might mean we have to take unpaid time off, Andrew’s current job gives 2 weeks paid time off to dads, but his previous job only offered unpaid leave. It would have been worth it to save some extra money so that wouldn’t be a burden.

3. Don’t go home early. My first night home was terrible. I couldn’t lie flat in bed without hurting my stomach, and I missed the hospital bed. I ended up sleeping in a recliner in the living room and it was the worst nights sleep I have ever had. 

4. Rest. Stay in bed. I would take the week or two while my husband was home and just sleep and enjoy my new baby. Especially since I will be recovering from another C-section. Last time, I continuously overexerted myself and my body took a long time to heal. There was a lot of blood and my doctor kept advising me to slow down but I didn’t and it just made things worse.

5. Know my physical limits, and keep them. I felt like I had to prove how tough I was after my C-sections. I was up moving as soon as my epidural wore off, and from the start I refused a lot of help. Walking and moving after a C-section is important and good, but I pushed it further than I should have. I should have taken it slower.

6. Let people help me. Postpartum is not a time to be too proud to accept or ask for help. 

A Little Break

Last month I wrote about how much I wanted some time away with my husband. That same day, Andrew came home and casually said, “I’ve been meaning to tell you, I worked it out with my parents for us to spend a night away.” I asked him if he read my latest blog post, he hadn’t. His timing was inspired.

IMG_2318.JPG

This is the only picture of the two of us we got, and clearly we are terrible at taking selfies! We had a great night away! Andrew also took a week off while his family was here visiting so we got a whole week to slow down, be together, and parent out girls as a team. Our evenings were spent snuggling on the couch while watching a new show. One night we even hired a babysitter for the first time, and the adults in the family met up for a game night.

Andrew has since gone back to work and my normal routine has started up again. But something, something intangible has changed. We are happier. I appreciate Andrew more. My life has been rebooted and it’s running much smoother now.

I only wish we had done this sooner!